Cancer Information

stereotactic radiation therapy

(STAYR-ee-oh-TAK-tik RAY-dee-AY-shun THAYR-uh-pee)

Stereotactic is derived from the Greek words stereos, meaning solid (as in 3-dimensional) and taxis, meaning arrangement, order, or orientation. Stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) implies the use of technologies, which improve targeting accuracy and allow for hypofractionated radiation delivery. Generally, a 3-dimensional coordinate system is used to localize the target(s) most accurately. Stereotactic techniques can be used with conventional fractionation (1.8–2 Gy per day), but because of improved targeting accuracy, SRT allows for hypofractionated radiation (larger doses per fraction, fewer number of fractions, and a shorter treatment course). Also called stereotactic external-beam radiation therapy and stereotaxic radiation therapy.

A type of external radiation therapy that uses special equipment to position the patient and precisely deliver radiation to a tumor. The total dose of radiation is divided into several smaller doses given over several days. Stereotactic radiation therapy is used to treat brain tumors and other brain disorders. It is also being studied in the treatment of other types of cancer, such as lung cancer. Also called stereotactic external-beam radiation therapy and stereotaxic radiation therapy.